art

swanh infographic

Star Wars has inspired all kinds of art in the 39 years since the release of the original movie. But this infographic by graphic artist and illustrator Martin Panchaud may be the most epic art I’ve seen yet.

Panchaud has created a 403-foot scrollable infographic that tells the entire story of the Special Edition of Star Wars: A New Hope.

Even Mark Hamill was impressed: [click to continue…]

post-it-mic-drop

Over the last few weeks, a pretty nerdy Post-It note war has been escalating on Canal Street in New York City, with ad agencies like Havas Worldwide, Horizon Media, Cake Group, Biolumina, Harrison and Star getting in on the action.

Well, Havas just went nuclear—and the shockwave could be felt for miles.

Surrender is imminent, but you can follow the battle as it unfolded on Twitter at #canalnotes.

(via ADWeek and Reddit)

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If you’re a Star Wars convention goer, it’s very likely you’ve met Roxy The Rancor and even had your picture taken with her.

Well, Roxy is about to get a buddy. [click to continue…]

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As an homage to the upcoming Pokémon Sun and Moon, artist Azure and Copper crafted these fun Sailor Moon Pokémon Trainer Cards. I like the idea of blending these two worlds, and I definitely think that Azure totally nailed the pairings. Check out more cards below…

darkyoda top

What do you think Yoda would be like if he ever turned to the Dark Side? Well, freelance artist and illustrator Daryl Mandryk took a crack at it with this awesome artwork.

Indeed, this Yoda has definitely given into the hate. See the full work below…

dc logo

For those of you who weren’t aware, DC Comics has revamped their logo…again. Naturally, some people aren’t keen on it. Case in point: Bobby Timony, an artist and illustrator, posted his “corrected” version of the new logo on Twitter, which adds a taste of the DC Bullet logo of yore. Personally, I dig it more than the official version. What do you think?
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Dan Martin in the man behind a webcomic called Deathbulge, and his brain is a delightful place. As evidence, I submit his 30 comedy Pokémon, all of which are a) absolutely hilarious, and b) not a far cry from the kind of thing the Pokémon games are actually doing these days.

Check out Martin’s full run of Fauxkémon, which is a word I just made up meaning “fake Pokémon”, below. [click to continue…]

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After acquiring a discarded wing mounted fuel tank from a F-94 bomber, San Francisco found object artist Nemo Gould proceeded to transform it into a shiny Megalodon sculpture complete with a bevy of moving parts.

The work recently made its debut at the “Perpetual Motion” exhibition at Heron Arts SF and was reportedly a huge hit, obviously because when sharks, art and old military aircraft parts meet it’s a recipe for awesome.

Check out additional pics and a few videos of the Megalodon in action below.

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paper mache smaug

This incredible paper mâché Smaug trophy by artist Dan Reeder is so real, it feels like Benedict Cumberbatch’s voice might emerge from it’s throat at any second. You know, if his head wasn’t chopped off and mounted on the wall that is.

At any rate, it’s pretty far from that balloon you covered with paper mâché when you were a kid.

“It’s hard trying to match a Hollywood digital version,” Reeder wrote on his blog. “But the challenge was part of the fun.”

See how it was made in the video below.

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dr who novels

One thing that makes Peter Capaldi’s turn as The Doctor so delightful is that he is probably the most hardcore Doctor Who fan that has ever been in the role.

As if you needed more evidence of his supreme Doctor Who geekdom, Capaldi recently attended an exhibit at the Cartoon Museum in London honoring art from the classic Doctor Who stories published by Target books. The books we a touchstone for many classic Who fans who wanted to revisit episodes that had already aired or were no longer available.

As you’ll see in the video below, there’s something special about listening to Capaldi and Moffat talk about what both the stories and artwork mean to them.

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