Dad Names New Daughter After A Mass Effect Character, Internet Goes Insane

tali'zorah

The name Tali’Zorah has been typed onto a little baby girl’s birth certificate thanks to Mass Effect loving gamer and new dad Adam and his wife.

The unique name seems to have been shortened to Tali by most of the hospital staff, but both parents think the full version is beautiful and have been set on it from day one.

However, Adam discussed their decision on The Escapist forums, and a flood of comments ensued with a variety of opinions. People accused Adam of using his kid as a “pet”, of ruining her life, of not caring that she’d be mocked. It was kinda…nuts. He writes:

Anyway, tomorrow my daughter is scheduled to be born. I’m freaking out and all that, but that’s not why I’m here. Since day 1, her first name was always going to be Tali’Zorah. It’s not necessarily “named after Mass Effect”, but rather my wife fell in love with the name during our first playthrough of ME1 many years ago. Confused friends and relatives are told “we wanted a nice Quarian name” just because it’s funny to see the confusion become worse.

All that aside, a couple of people have told me that we’re nuts for giving a child that name. I like it a lot, I’m assuming she’ll like it, and I don’t think she’ll get teased for it or anything like that. Out of curiosity, am I totally off base about that? For further discussion value, this thread can be about the entire concept of video games being used to inspire names.

Sure, Adam asked, but even he came back to the thread the next day to remark that he never thought it would get that sort of feedback.

I dunno. I like it. It’s pretty and, apparently, she won’t be alone in having been named after a video game character. Kotaku notes that they were informed that other babies have been named Liara, Garrus Cortana and Raiden.

Here’s a link to Adam’s more recent update, complete with a pretty on target observation on the nature of internet comments. ::grin::

(via Kotaku)

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