An Anatomical Drawing of the Hulk’s Skull

I am not in medicine because, ew, blood and guts, but this is still an amazing drawing. It’s the work of Glendon Mellow who is both a comic book fan and an illustrator with an interest in evolutionary biology. He drew this back in 2002 as a fan tribute using his mother’s nursing school anatomy textbooks as well as gorilla and hominid ancestor skulls. He even incorporated details from the Marvel universe by making scars in the bone over one eye in recognition of his battles with Wolverine.

Click on the image to enlarge. You can also read the detailed notes on the image after the jump…

TOP LEFT
The Hulk Reviewed
Points of interest concerning the osteological and muscular systems.

TOP LEFT: The Skull
Note muscle-anchoring protuberances and ridges not found in average frontal and zygomatic bones.
Enlarged and bifurcated nasal cavities; see Appendix 3.1 for discussion and speculation of respiratory efficiency. See also; ribcage and spinal cord sinuses.
Note disproportion of maxilla to mandible.

TOP RIGHT: The Skull
Grossly enlarged frontal fontanelle, similarity to Zinjanthropus found in 1959.
Three scars unhealed grazing left ocular cavity; unusually, no traces of foreign molecules

TOP LEFT
The Hulk Reviewed
Points of interest concerning the osteological and muscular systems.

TOP LEFT: The Skull
Note muscle-anchoring protuberances and ridges not found in average frontal and zygomatic bones.
Enlarged and bifurcated nasal cavities; see Appendix 3.1 for discussion and speculation of respiratory efficiency. See also; ribcage and spinal cord sinuses.
Note disproportion of maxilla to mandible.

TOP RIGHT: The Skull
Grossly enlarged frontal fontanelle, similarity to Zinjanthropus found in 1959.
Three scars unhealed grazing left ocular cavity; unusually, no traces of foreign molecules present.
Connective tissue spurs above eyeteeth at gumline.
Note complete absence of tooth decay or erosion.
Analysis of blood vessel to marrow ratios reveals skeletal system itself surprisingly fragile relative to comparisons with muscle and tissue tensile densities.

BOTTOM RIGHT: Musculature
Layers of cartilage and dense marrow-like tumours surround blood vessels; protecting both vessels and braincase simultaneously.
Jaw muscles extend to skull ridge homologous to gorilla.
Note muscles allowing subject to shut nostrils: unheard of in primates. This trait normally found in desert-dwelling ungulates such as dromedary camel.
Jaw may lock while mandible is at any degree of extension.
Elasticity of muscle tissues allows striations and contractions on 4-axis per muscle. Eyes and mouth can close using enormous, continuous pressure.

Connective tissue spurs above eyeteeth at gumline.
Note complete absence of tooth decay or erosion.
Analysis of blood vessel to marrow ratios reveals skeletal system itself surprisingly fragile relative to comparisons with muscle and tissue tensile densities.

BOTTOM RIGHT: Musculature
Layers of cartilage and dense marrow-like tumours surround blood vessels; protecting both vessels and braincase simultaneously.
Jaw muscles extend to skull ridge homologous to gorilla.
Note muscles allowing subject to shut nostrils: unheard of in primates. This trait normally found in desert-dwelling ungulates such as dromedary camel.
Jaw may lock while mandible is at any degree of extension.
Elasticity of muscle tissues allows striations and contractions on 4-axis per muscle. Eyes and mouth can close using enormous, continuous pressure.

(Scientific American via io9)

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